The Amorphousness of Glass

     Amorphousness (Greek) or formlessness is a term characterizing a particular state of a substance when there is no correctness in its structure. Such an amorphous state of matter is contrasted with a crystalline state, in which the substance has a regular crystal lattice. Amorphous, in addition to glass, are substances such as obsidian (natural mineral glass), resins, gum, glue, proteins, etc.



Crystalline Substance
Crystalline Substance
   Amorphous and crystalline substances in nature are clearly distinguished by their appearance. Crystalline substances are bounded on the outside by regular planes, which determine their characteristic form (crystals), while amorphous (or shapeless) solids are homogeneous in their whole mass and often have a conchoidal fracture. When melting, amorphous solids pass from a solid to a liquid state gradually, and not instantly, as it is observed in crystalline substances. In the same way, their hardening is slow: the mass is first made soft and viscous until it finally hardens.

Tree Resin
Tree Resin

       Natural glass, one of the first natural materials, which was widely used in everyday life, both as an instrument of labor and as parts of different types of weapons (knives, arrowhead, spears, etc.), and for making jewelry and other household items. Thanks to its amorphous structure, it has properties that seem inaccessible to many other traditional materials. This was used, for example, by the Aztecs, who made unique tools from obsidian.

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